Logarithmic Maps of the Universe

With ever improving telescopes we can now see that there are at least 100 billion galaxies (and even possibly up to 500 billion) throughout the Universe and each one, like our Milky Way, is a unique galaxy made up of hundreds of billions of stars. Through quantum leaps in knowledge, progress is underway to map the entire Universe by way of logarithmic maps of the Universe.

Evolution of Logarithmic Maps

In 1986 a monumental step in the sciences of astronomy and astrophysics took place – positions of galaxy clusters were represented on a computer model – and from there, for the first time, scientists could get a visual concept of what the Universe truly looks like.

Today we have access to Logarithmic Maps of the Universe, in part, thanks to two Princeton Astronomers – Dr J Richard Gott and Mario Juric. Essentially their map shows the entire observable Universe and calls on a variety of data, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, to continue on the quest to map the millions of galaxies and their locations.

"We have produced a new conformal map of the Universe illustrating recent discoveries, ranging from Kuiper belt objects in the Solar system, to the galaxies and quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This map projection, based on the logarithm map of the complex plane, preserves shapes locally, and yet is able to display the entire range of astronomical scales from the Earth's neighborhood to the cosmic microwave background. The conformal nature of the projection, preserving shapes locally, may be of particular use for analyzing large scale structure. Prominent in the map is a Sloan Great Wall of galaxies 1.37 billion light years long, 80% longer than the Great Wall discovered by Geller and Huchra and therefore the largest observed structure in the Universe."

J. Richard Gott III, Mario Juric, David Schlegel, Fiona Hoyle, Michael Vogeley, Max Tegmark, Neta Bahcall, Jon Brinkmann

These logarithmic images can be used as a helpful visual reference to learning more about the Universe and they illustrate recent discoveries, from Kuiper belt objects in the Solar system, to the galaxies and quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.  These map projections are based on the logarithm map of the complex plane and preserves shapes locally while also being able to display the entire range of astronomical scales from the Earth's galaxy to the cosmic microwave background.

Different from an ordinary graph where each tic mark increases additively (add a fix quantity to the mark before like 0, 10, 20, 30, 40) on a logarithmic scale each tic mark is a factor 10 times bigger (10, 100, 1000, 10000). This is an excellent way to show objects that increase quickly over several scales. On a logarithmic map the horizontal axis is right ascension, but declination has been replaced by logarithmic distance.

The Maps

Complete Map of the universe

Also available are several individual sheets without horizontal axes plotted, these can be printed and taped together:


Individual sheets with horizontal axes that aids in the study of astronomic bodies:


Features:


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